Blog module icon

Displaying all posts tagged with:

'recommendations'

Oct 16

Spooky Season Reading Recommendations by Andrea Lorenz

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on October 16, 2020 at 3:10 PM by Genesis Gaule

Even though I am a huge wimp, I still love to dip my toe into horror stories this time of year. There’s something about the fall -- the skeletal trees, the gusts of wind rustling leaves on the ground, the chill in the air -- that draws me to the spooky. Lucky for me, and for you, we’ve got a wide range of horror – titles for those who want the mildest of scares all the way up to hardcore scary gore-core. If you’re looking to dip your toe in too here are a few titles that are my Goldilocks level of horror (not too tame, not too scary, just right).

Wanderers by Chuck Wendig

(Science Fiction WENDIG) Chuck Wendig weaves a tale that is oh-so-prescient in Wanderers. A young girl gets out of bed one morning and starts walking. She doesn’t talk or respond, just walks. And soon others join her. A flock of sleepwalkers begins a cross-country journey, no stops for food or rest, just a relentless push forward. They’re protected by “shepherds” – family and friends who follow the flock, determined to find out what’s wrong, determined to protect them. For on their journey, they will discover an America convulsed with terror and violence, where this apocalyptic epidemic proves less dangerous than the fear of it.

The Outsider by Stephen King

(Mystery KING | eAudiobook) When Flint City’s beloved Little League Coach, Terry Maitland is implicated in a gruesome crime, the whole city reels. Terry Maitland, the English teacher, a murderer? No one can believe it. Though Maitland has an alibi, Detective Ralph Anderson orders a quick arrest – he has Terry’s DNA all over the scene. As the investigation expands and evidence proving Maitland’s alibi surfaces, more questions than answers emerge. How can one person be in the same place at the same time? I was drawn to The Outsider by its description of a confounding murder investigation, but I stuck with it as it twisted into a search for a supernatural predator. (And Holly Gibney – you’ll want to meet Holly Gibney!)

The Southern Book Club’s Guide to Slaying Vampires by Grady Hendrix

(eBook) If you like a little humor with your horror, check out the Southern Book Club’s Guide to Slaying Vampires by Grady Hendrix. When a mysterious and handsome stranger moves into Patricia Campbell’s quiet neighborhood in Charleston, she’s intrigued. The only other exciting thing in Patricia’s life is her book club, a group of Charleston mothers united only by their love for true crime and suspenseful fiction. But when some local children go missing, Patricia begins to suspect that the newcomer might be involved. She begins her own investigation and uncovers something much more horrifying than she had anticipated.

Honorable mentions:

Oct 09

Cooking my way through the library by Genesis Gaule

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on October 9, 2020 at 5:20 PM by Genesis Gaule

One of my favorite shelves in the library to peruse is the cookbook section (Nonfiction 641.5). There’s just something about flipping through pages of beautifully photographed food and reading the stories behind the recipes--it’s like getting a peek at someone’s else’s family and exploring their culture one dish at a time.

When one catches my eye, I can’t wait to take it home and dive in. Here are three such cookbooks from the library I am exploring now.

ultimate-bread

Ultimate Bread by Eric Treuille

If you are new to bread-making, Ultimate Bread is a great place to start. With photographed step-by-step techniques, ingredient information, and easy-to-follow instructions, they take the mystery out of bread-making. From naan to grissini to sandwich bread, there’s a wide sampling of various yeast, flat, and quick bread recipes from around the world to choose from. The muffin recipe is easily customizable and the hearty Irish Soda Bread and Victorian Milk Bread are both wonderful with a cup of stew or slathered with butter and jam. If you’re a chocoholic, be sure to give the Chocolate Prune Bread a try!

sioux-chef

The Sioux Chef's Indigenous Kitchen by Sean Sherman

The Sioux Chef Indigenous Kitchen

No fry bread or Indian tacos here! Oglala Lakota caterer and food educator based out of Minneapolis, Sean Sherman, shares his history, culture, and approach to creating authentic indigenous food specific to our northern Midwest region. Using traditional ingredients and techniques, Sean creates vibrant, healthful dishes that are elegant as well as accessible for the home cook. Through recipes such as Three Sisters Mash, Cedar Braised Bison, and Fried Wild Rice Bowl, he encourages you to explore traditional local flavors such as juniper, sumac, and cedar, but also offers substitutes if those ingredients are hard to find. The book is a great read on its own and a rich introduction to Native ideology and food.

indianish

Indian-ish: Recipes and Antics from a Modern American Family by Priya Krishna

Indian-ish is a loving tribute to Priya’s mom’s self-taught Indian-American cooking that merges the Indian flavors of her childhood with American staples. The results are approachable and packed with flavor. A few I’m eager to try include Dahi Toast (Spiced yogurt sandwiches), Aloo Gobi (Spiced potatoes with cauliflower), and Saag Feta (Feta cooked in spinach sauce). The book is also filled with funny stories, candid photos, and original illustrations that gives you the feeling of pulling up a chair at the Krishna dinner table.

Sep 25

But is the movie really better? by Michelle Flaws

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on September 25, 2020 at 1:34 PM by Genesis Gaule

Recently I found myself scrolling through all of the newest book adaptations available on Netflix. Young adult novels are really having a moment--which got me thinking about some of my favorites. Some readers may argue with some of my choices but polling my coworkers on their picks was entertaining because we all appreciate different genres and their adaptations

So what movies made it onto the good list?

What about the bad?

The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne was filmed in 1995 with Gary Oldman and Demi Moore, in one word: embarrassing. The adaptation miserably failed to portray the suspense and restraint behind this forbidden love story. Eragon by Christopher Paolini hit the big screen in 2006 and despite having seasoned actors and a well established production company, it left the fans much to desire. The costumes, the special effects and the dialogue did not match the thrill we felt when reading the novel for the first time.

The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells received a second screen adaptation in 1996 with Marlon Brando, Val Kilmer and David Thewlis playing titular characters. Filming and production on this movie was notorious for setbacks and crew disagreements; did the heat from filming on location render them unproductive? The movie lacks the ability to demonstrate the horror that is a man toying with nature to create hybrid creatures. While the story is supposed to be disturbing, this remake leaves much to be desired. Every time I think of Marlon Brando wearing white face paint and a giant kaftan I face-palm.

What about those adaptations that have inconsistencies with its novel counterpart but are still worth seeing in the movie theatre?

Here are some recommendations:

Watch them and compare! Decide for yourself and become a fan of the book and the movie!