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'easy nonfiction'

Sep 12

Book Notes 9/12/2022

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on September 12, 2022 at 1:29 PM by Genesis Gaule

Blog Book Notes

9/12/2022


To celebrate Library Card Sign-Up Month, amateur artist of all ages are invited to design a library card and share what their library means to them! Entries must be submitted by October 1. More information...


3D Printing and Maker Lab for Kids by Eldrid Sequeira

Create Amazing Projects with CAD Design and STEAM Ideas // This book presents hands-on activities for learning how to use browser-based software TinkerCAD and SketchUp to design and print projects, along with informative sidebars to support related STEAM concepts.

621.988 SEQUEIRA


Speak, Okinawa by Elizabeth Miki Brina

A Memoir // A searing, deeply candid memoir about a young woman's journey to understanding her complicated parents--her father a Vietnam veteran, her mother an Okinawan war bride--and her own, fraught cultural heritage.

973.0495 BRINA | Large Print


Cutting Machine Crafts with your Cricut, Sizzix, or Silhouette by Lia Griffith

Die Cutting Machine Projects to Make with 60 SVG Files // Every project includes easy instructions and plenty of variations so you can get the most out of your machine. With an introduction to electronic die cutting machines and options for cutting the templates out by hand, this book is full of inspiration and expert advice.

745.54 GRIFFITH


Simple Pasta by Odette Williams

Recipes to Make Everyone Happy, Any Night of the Week // Making homemade pasta simple, enjoyable, and delicious, this cookbook showcases the endless possibilities for creating pasta dishes that are singular and memorable.

641.8653 RICHARDSON


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

View Book Notes PDF archive

Nov 04

There is a Book to Help by Vanesa Gomez

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on November 4, 2021 at 4:32 PM by Genesis Gaule

In a perfect world, children would never be exposed to difficulties and hardships. They would never have to grow up too soon or feel unsafe. They could simply be kids. Unfortunately, life doesn’t discriminate. When these struggles arise, it can be difficult to find a way to answer questions or work through their feelings in an age appropriate way. 

Books can be a great tool to help children (and adults!) find the words for their feelings and cope. Whether it is for more common obstacles like bullying and divorce or other sensitive issues like, poverty, domestic violence, immigrating to a new country, or death of a loved one, books can help provide advice and comfort. Picture books are also a great way to encourage empathy for others in children that may be living these situations. 

These books are best read together with plenty of time afterwards for questions. With books that deal with sensitive subjects, it is always good practice for a grownup to read the book beforehand, and determine if there is a struggle that you or your child is facing, there is a book to help.

Home Life

Divorce

Death / Loss

Bullying

Immigration

  • The Color Collector by Nicholas Solis and Renia Metallinou
    Topic: Homesickness, friendship // Easy SOLIS
  • My name is Sangoel by Karen Lynn Williams, Khadra Mohammed, and Catherine Stock
    Topic: Refugee, names // Easy WILLIAMS
  • Home is in Between by Mitali Perkins and Lavanya Naidu
    Topic: Traditions, culture // Easy PERKINS

People with Disabilities

Adoption

Sep 03

Do You Remember the Lyrics? by Charlotte Helgeson

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on September 3, 2021 at 2:25 PM by Genesis Gaule

Are you singing the right lyrics to the songs you learned as a kid? I love to hear children sing. If the words aren’t quite the ones I remember, that doesn’t matter. They sing with their hearts and I can hum along, but do I remember the lyrics?

For the life of me, I cannot remember the lyrics to Somewhere Over the Rainbow. I obviously made up some words as a kid and that is how I remember it. Though sometimes, my curiosity (or the funny looks of my grandchildren) will cause me to find the original lyrics to some of my favorites.

home on the rangeThe Library can come to the rescue for lots of those songs especially in the Easy section. We can find Home On the Range edited by Barbie H. Schwaeber. It is based on a poem written by a Kansas homesteader, Dr. Brewster M. Higley. Others have tried to take credit for it and have tried to change the words. Ranchers, farmers and cowboys adopted the song as an unofficial anthem for the American West. Kansas adopted it as their state song. But how did it get to be so well known?

The story behind a song can be a lot of fun. Another book by the same title, Home On the Range: John A. Lomax and His Cowboy Songs by Deborah Hopkinson tells how as a young man, John went out with an old-fashioned recording device in the early 1900s to capture songs that were sung by cowboys. Then he wrote them down for us. He went out again later in life and captured more songs. Many of his recordings of singing cowboys are stored at the Library of Congress. I bet those cowboys would be surprised to know their voices live on in such a prestigious place!

take me out to ball gameTake Me Out to the Ball Game by Jack Norworth is another unofficial anthem. Baseball games would not be the same without this song even though we only sing one of the three verses. How many of us know the words to the other two?

To help us remember songs from our youth, the Library has a wonderful selection of DVDs called Sentimental Sing-Alongs. Their topics range from patriotic to romance and from locations all over the country.

We do grow up and discover new songs and with them singers who become favorites. Some write their own music and others have lyricists that create the words for them. There are those who redo an old classic with their own personality by changing up the music, but the lyrics live on.

Lyrics catch attention so they’re often used as titles like in these books owned by the library: