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Campbell Unclassified

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Jul 03

Graphic Novels on Overdrive by Genesis Gaule

Posted on July 3, 2020 at 2:12 PM by Genesis Gaule

If you are a fan of graphic novels and comic books, here are three great selections available on Overdrive you can read right now on your tablet or web browser!


Smile by Raina Telgemeier

Becoming your most unattractive self when you hit adolescence is like a rite of passage, but what if you added dental trauma on top of it? Smile recounts Telgemeier's dental nightmares and social struggles she endured between the sixth and ninth grades. Even readers who weren't/aren’t forced to wear braces will identify with the author's troubles with friends, feelings for the boy who ignores her, and difficulties figuring out just who she is.

Suggested Age: 10 and up (dental trauma, surgery/blood, puberty, bullying)

smile comic panel

The Stonekeeper (Amulet Series, Book 1) by Kazu Kibuishi

After the tragic death of their father, Emily and Navin move with their mother to the home of her deceased great-grandfather, but the ancient house holds a dangerous magic amulet and a portal to a strange world filled with creepy man-eating monsters, sentient robots, and talking animals. Their way home blocked and their mother's life on the line, what is Emily willing to risk to save the people she loves?

Suggested Age: 10 and up (creepy imagery, death, life-and-death action)

It's not the stone I'm after, it's you

They Called Us Enemy by George Takei

Before he braved new frontiers in Star Trek, George Takei was a four-year-old boy and one of over 100,000 Japanese Americans imprisoned by the U.S. government in American concentration camps during World War II. Takei recounts his child-like innocence of the horrific events as well as the political climate and his parents recounted stories; beautifully highlighted by Harmony Becker's black and white illustrations.

Suggested Age: 15 and up (war, dehumanization, racial violence, politics, grief and loss)

I saw people crying and couldn't understand why. Daddy said we were going on vacation.

Be sure to check out our Overdrive catalog for more great graphic novels and comic books!

Jun 30

E-Book Notes 6/29/2020

Posted on June 30, 2020 at 3:13 PM by Genesis Gaule

Open books and the words book notes

6/29/2020


These are all e-books. Click on the book title to view the book in our Overdrive catalog ?. If you need help accessing them, email or call us and we will get back to you as soon as possible. 

Me and White Supremacy by Layla Saad

The vanishing half

Cecilia Ross, despite being a motivational speaker, can’t take her own advice. Still reeling from the death of her best friend, and freshly aware of the need to live more fully now, she downsizes and moves to into a beautiful old house in St. Paul with three housemates.

Fast. Feast. Repeat. by Gin Stephens

The family upstairs

Sydney is enjoying the great life: she’s in college, working a steady job, in love with her boyfriend, and rooming with her best friend. But everything changes when she discovers that her boyfriend is cheating on her.

Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle by Emily and Amelia Nagoski

The end of october

When Kurt Austin—the leader of a National Underwater & Marine Agency exploration team—rescues marine archaeologist Nina Kirov, he becomes the target of Don Halcon—a madman bent on carving a new nation out of the southwestern US and Mexico—because of the discovery that Nina just made.

My Lovely Wife by Samantha Downing

The knockout queen

Newly revised, this memoir tells Jeremy’s story—his spiritual journey after losing his beloved wife Melissa just months after their wedding—behind his hit song “I Still Believe” which inspired millions.

View Book Notes PDF archive

Jun 26

My First Visit to a Public Library by Charlotte Helgeson

Posted on June 26, 2020 at 1:57 PM by Genesis Gaule

I was 16 years old before I entered a public library.

jane eyre by bronte book-cover

My driving started early on the farm, but it didn’t translate into driving my own vehicle regularly until I left for college. Driving to town usually meant running an errand for my parents, like groceries or going to pick up an equipment part. Those errands never included the public library. In fact, I’m certain I never considered it until I couldn’t get a copy of Jane Eyre at the high school library.  

I didn’t regularly read classics as a teenager, but I was intrigued when a title was not included in our school library and my teachers and librarian would not help me get a copy. What was it all about? Why didn’t they want me to read it?

Curiosity is powerful. 

I walked up the front steps to our brick public library. Straight in from the front door, the circulation desk held court. Nervous, even though I spent a lot of time in our school library, I stood directly in front of the desk and waited for the librarian to address me--in a whisper.  

“May I have a copy of Jane Eyre?”  I asked.

“Do you have a library card?” She knew me as well as she knew everyone in our small town. I’d be willing to bet that she also knew the name on every single Library Card.

“No.” I was prepared to turn around and leave. I had no idea what I was supposed to do to gain the privilege only she could bestow on me.  

“Age.” That was meant as a question though it sounded like a condemnation.

“Sixteen.” She pulled out an application card and continued with the questions until she had filled it with her beautiful script. Without another word, she walked through the doors behind her and I listened intently to make sure she hadn’t abandoned me. On her return, she set the library’s copy of Jane Eyre on the counter, removed the card in its back pocket, wrote my name on it with a due date two weeks in the future and stamped the same date on the slip inside the back cover.  

She looked up at me and said, “As you can see this book has been well used. Be kind to it and I expect it back as you have received it.”  

I was afraid to pick it up. A rubberband held it together. Honestly, I had no intention of taking a deep breath while holding it certain that if it didn’t smell like a Great Uncle then my eyes deceived me. Decrepit, abused or much loved? I didn’t know the difference. I had a public library book. I had a library card!  

I read that book, gently turning each page, breathing shallowly and then returning it--early.